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Google Glass: Will It Bring Clarity to Our Lives?

Google put a phone in your pocket, maps on your computer, android on your TV, a cheap tablet in your backpack and now they’re trying to take over a new part of your life: your face.


Google Glass Explorer is  a new venture to put googly googs on your eyes.


Google aims to roll out Glass Explorer in the third Fiscal Quarter of 2013. Units will be available just in time for the holiday season. The price is not yet known. Technology experts from The New York Times and The Verge predict it will run somewhere between $99 to $249.


Glass will be a heads-up-display. It will always be in your peripheral vision and always accessible with the simple prompt, “okay glass,” followed by a command:


“Okay glass, take a picture.” Boom. Glass takes a picture.


“Okay glass, call mom.” Glass calls your mother right away.


Glass is thin and light: purposely designed to get out of the way. You aren’t supposed to notice it on your face. The goal is to have the technology there when you need it, and have it disappear when you don’t.


Imagine wanting to check the weather. Ask Google Glass. What about directions to a coffee shop? Google Glass. And do you want to show your buddy what it’s like to be 300 feet in the air in a hot air balloon? Yes, Google Glass can show you.


But Google Glass is more than a product strapped to your face. Imagine being able to access the plethora of information available on Google’s servers, talk to your friends anytime and anywhere without having to lift a finger or being able to wish your children goodnight while showing them the view from your hotel window on a business trip. You can do all these things and more with Google Glass.


Google’s Glasses are also very sleek and stylish, coming in the colors of charcoal, tangerine, shale, cotton and sky.


But some fear that Google Glass will disrupt the flow of everyday life. Critics suspect people will walk around thoughtlessly and bump into people while using Google Glass, just as they already do with their their smart phones.


But others think Google Glass is the wave of the future, that it will not disconnect us, but rather, it will bring us closer.


Google believes their new product will make life faster, more efficient and more enjoyable. The company recruited a group of testers for Glass, called “Explorers,” individuals who will have to shell out $1500 to access, test and keep a sample Google Glass.


“We set out to find a truly diverse group of Explorers, and that’s certainly what we’ve gotten. We need honest feedback from people who are not only enthralled and excited by Glass, but also people who are skeptical and critical of it,” Google Posted on its Google Plus Website.

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