Skip to main content

Editorial: HP Without Apotheker



For less than a year Leo Apotheker had joined HP. In less than a year, he successfully destroyed it's vital pieces. And in less than a year, he cancelled the results of a $1.2 Billion acquisition that had so much potential- all because he lacked the testicular will power to rival with the competition.

Reading this title we can look at the former HP CEO's effects in two ways- the positive or the negative. Unfortunately though, it's almost impossible to find such a positive. He came in and left behind him in his departure a comparative disaster upon which it will take years to fix. The result of his actions has left both himself and the company he ran in a laughing stock all across Silicon Valley. It's easy to look at what he did while he was in power- but it's incredibly difficult to imagine the future of the company now that he has finally left it behind him.



HP was founded as a hardware company. From the beginning of it's emerging existence, the company grew from making calculators to personal computers and advanced systems. And in the 90s, the company brought the PC into new light and embraced the power of Microsoft Windows. In the early 2000s, the company launched itself even further as a household name, with everyday home products designed for budgeted consumers. In the mid-2000s, the company acquired Compaq and officially launched itself as the largest PC maker in the world.

Sure, HP has done software before- but it isn't really their specialty. To give up their hardware sector, or even spin it off is a crazy move. And honestly, it's hard to see the company truly go forward doing it. Apotheker's move to ditch hardware completely is beyond insane- and since the board is being given the decision without the threat of Apotheker looming over them, it seems fitting that they will be able to make the right decision without error.

Apotheker had also killed off HP's year-old acquisition of Palm. The cost of such, which needs to be reiterated as many times as it takes before the man realizes what a waste this decision was- $1.2 Billion. That's no chump change- even for HP. The company and it's leading software platform- webOS had so much potential it makes me sick to my stomach.

Apotheker had in his hands the tool capable of successfully rivaling Apple's iOS and iDevices and he axed it just because it didn't become "number one plus" in the incredibly short time it was on the market. The TouchPad wasn't even given a proper month before it was axed by HP. But ol' Leo was too afraid of taking proper and normal business risks, so he kicked the platform to the curb and called it quits. It didn't really have a chance as long as Apotheker was behind the steering wheel.

Without Leo in-house as CEO or the power of a board member, HP has apparently been awarded a second chance to pick itself back up and come back with both guns ready and loaded. When all else fails- try something new. That's the problem with all of these companies. All they strive to do is copy Apple. And look how it pays off. Lawsuits knee deep and product bans in Europe.

What HP needs to do to succeed- and any company for that matter- is to actually take the time, effort, energy and risk of putting out a totally new product that bests everything on the market or generates a new category. Apple's been doing this for years. It's about taking risks and building the best damned product you possibly can. Not the HP TouchPad, which was rushed to market with a glitchy OS and internals from yesteryear.

HP needs to step up to the plate and make a stand. No other company yet has succeeded in doing so. And if this continues, Apple will successfully monopolize the market. HP and everybody else playing this game cannot let that happen. We as consumers can't let that happen. Choice is such a good thing- it's what makes being in this country so great. And if HP doesn't do it, somebody else will. Or won't. Maybe their CEO will chicken out and call it quits too.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

2016 or 2020? The Losing Strategy of Centrism

It feels like it’s 2016 all over again for the Democrats. Fighting through an overcrowded field of initially over 20 candidates, Bernie Sanders and Joe Biden have emerged as the frontrunners for presidential nominee in the Democratic Party. Both candidates are wildly different from each other on nearly every issue from healthcare, to student debt, climate change, and everything in-between. Biden represents a resurgent albeit uninspiring consensus of a panicked  Democratic Establishment (comprised of the DNC and its wealthy donors, not African American voters as a confused Biden recently suggested) that has made this same bet on centrists before with Walter Mondale, Al Gore, John Kerry, and most recently, Hillary Clinton—and each time we lost big to Republicans. Conversely, Sanders represents a party running to the left, fed up with the imbalance of wealth and power in the American political system, Bernie embodies a progressive vision for an America that works for everyone, not corpor…

Tap Tap! The Apple Watch Review

7 A.M, I wake up to a gentle ringing and pick up my beautiful silver Apple Watch from the pseudo-charging cradle that lays beside my bed on a nightstand: it is time for another day with my latest toy and companion.

As I shower, watch on wrist, I shift through Bob Dylan and Joan Baez tracks while checking the weather and responding to late night texts I had missed. The watch, although quoted to be water resistant, is in actuality waterproof for short periods of time and ignorant to certain low water pressures.

On my drive to the office my watch vibrates with a reminder to call my friend David, who I easily ask Siri to call and I talk to from my watch. Is this real life? Sure is! The sound isn't tinny, it's not booming either, but just loud and clear enough to enjoy the conversation instead of dreading it.

Throughout the work day I receive dozens of light taps that don't annoy me the way my obnoxious Pebble did (vibrating so loud it would shake the table under my wrists). The…

Why Isn't Everyone Using Ubuntu? (Rant)

I've been an avid Linux user for many years now, starting with my adoption of Red Hat on my old beige box HP, going down to running Ubuntu 7.04 on my old Gateway 15 inch hunker of a laptop, and now on my 14 inch Dell Vostro 3450. I've at least tried every version of Canonical's famous community-supported OS since 2003. And I've also experienced such distros as Fedora, Mint and MEPIS. Needless to say, I've certainly gotten my feet wet in the Linux world, so using Ubuntu has never been anything new or odd to me.

There's just something so intimate about using Linux, from the installation, to boot, to use- everything feels more personal, more customized, more free. And isn't that the very purpose for the existence of Linux distributions?

This in itself is one of the main reasons I typically recommend Ubuntu over other linux distributions. It works with incredible consistency, is supported by an unbelievably large community of devout users, is super easy to use, a…